The Beginning. A Message from 2020 to the Future.

About this event

Dear Reader,

The date is 1st October 2020, as of this day we have 0 members.

Hi, my name is Jack, I am the DSC Lead of 2020. Today is 13th November 2020. I am also currently head of the Entrepreneurship & Tech Team at the LSESU Business & Investment Group, I study Politics and Economics at LSE. I doubt anyone will read this, but I sincerely hope to whoever you are, that the DSC still continues no matter what! It has been a huge hassle to start the DSC but it's finally here, it's midnight during the Covid-19 pandemic, and I should be revising, I literally have a practice exam tomorrow, Hahaha.

I hope the LSE DSC becomes a great student society that branches out to all societies in LSE and the UK or even beyond. A society and community that has rid of any kind of bureaucracy. I hope we can work together with empathy, support, and teamwork.

Beyond anything, I hope you understand 3 lessons to take wherever you go:

(1) Yes Man (2008) - The movie "Yes Man" starring Jim Carrey is easily one of the stupidest movies of all time, but the one with the best messages. Say "yes" to every single opportunity that you can. Seriously. It has really helped me go far and do so much, I don't want to boast. Don't worry about the what ifs or the risks. Just Do It, but do it cautiously, know that people are out there who are betting on you to fail. Learn from the consequences and mistakes. 

(2) Empathy - I once met a J.P. Morgan CEO and MD (classic LSE), he told me "the world on the fundamental level is all about how you treat people. It's about people, your relationships with those people, and how you treat yourself". The greatest skill that I am trying to learn is empathy. Empathy for my team, my friends, and my family. Understanding the perspective of others and truly taking the time to understand why someone is arguing something and reaching a compromise or a discussion is ESSENTIAL. You may completely disagree that the world is flat, but take the time to understand why they think that, why do they fear the government, do they have good reason to do so? I wonder, if everyone had just more empathy, wouldn't that solve all the world's problems?

(3) Don't follow the crowd - I remember a time when I used to come home crying from school in secondary school complaining to my mum that "I had no friends", (1) develop and grow yourself, become a better person not only in terms of knowledge but the moral stances you decide to take. How do you do this? Experience as much as possible. I can guarantee you right now if you take an hour of your time to search of opportunities that you are eligible for you would find 100. But yet people in LSE or your network probably only focus on the 20 out there, it's the "mainstream". But somewhere else another set of 20 things are the "mainstream", don't be afraid to keep searching, don't be afraid to keep trying. As for step (2) uhhhhh I kind of forgot, probably find better friends? I still haven't found my right group, great friends come and go for me, they move countries, and everyone's lives diverge sometimes. If you have your own group great for you. That's life. Keep moving, develop yourself, help those around you, help the world, be kind.

Whoever read the whole thing, man... hats off to you. You probably need help hahah...  but somehow if you need it I am all ears, find me and tell me the code word: Asparagus. You will have 100% of my attention, guaranteed. It would be epic if I do something cool and someone comes back to tell me all this. But I will have to do a security check on you or something before I trust with you with anything.

Oh and one last thing, have you watched "How I Met Your Mother" yet?

Consider this message. Sealed.

- Jack Lee Cheng-Xuan (October, 2020)

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jacklcx/ (if I am not on there ask LSE or Wellington College)


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